Knowledge Base

VisionPro Glasses Lenses will always include:

  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-reflective Coating** (Water resistant, easy to clean)
  • 100% UV Filter.
  • Blue Light Blocking Coating (Anti Eyestrain)

** Except for 1.56 Index clear lenses which will have regular anti-reflective coating. 

To adhere with our commitment to provide best in class eye care to our customer, we only support higher index to make them look better, provide high eye visibility. Currently we are supporting below lenses:

Lens Usage

Lens Type

Features

Clear Lenses

1.56 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to normal CR39 lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Anti-Reflective Coating

1.61 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.56 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.

1.67 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.61 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.

1.71 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.67 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.

1.74 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.71 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.

Sunglasses Lenses (Always Dark) -

Prescription Sunglasses, good for Outdoor. 

1.56 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to regular CR39 lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.
  • Currently only support Non-Polarized Coating.
  • Available Solid Color Options -
    • Grey (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Amber (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Purple (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Yellow (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Green (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Blue (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Pink (10%, 50%, 80%)
  • Available Gradient Color option -
    • Grey, Green, Amber, Blue, Purple, Pink, Yellow

1.61 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.56 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.
  • Select Polarized or Non-Polarized Coating.
  • Available Solid Color Options -
    • Grey (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Amber (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Purple (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Yellow (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Green (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Blue (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Pink (10%, 50%, 80%)
  • Available Gradient Color option -
    • Grey, Green, Amber, Blue, Purple, Pink, Yellow

1.67 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.61 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.
  • Select Polarized or Non-Polarized Coating.
  • Available Solid Color Options -
    • Grey (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Amber (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Purple (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Yellow (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Green (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Blue (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Pink (10%, 50%, 80%)
  • Available Gradient Color option -
    • Grey, Green, Amber, Blue, Purple, Pink, Yellow

Digital Protection Lenses 

Non-prescription Lens for Digital Usage

*As a standard Non-prescription digital protection uses 1.56 index lenses.

We also offer Digital protection coated lenses for all prescription lenses (which includes Clear lenses, Sunglasses & Photochromic). 

  • Thinner compare to regular CR39 lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Anti-Reflective Coating.
  • Select Polarized or Non-Polarized Coating.
  • Option to Select Photochromic Coating (Self timer tinting)
  • Available Solid Color Options -
    • Grey (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Amber (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Purple (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Yellow (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Green (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Blue (10%, 50%, 80%)
    • Pink (10%, 50%, 80%)
  • Available Gradient Color option -
    • Grey, Green, Amber, Blue, Purple, Pink, Yellow

Photochromic Lenses

Self-Tinting Lenses 

1.56 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to regular CR39 lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Anti-Reflective Coating.
  • Photochromic Len Color - Grey

1.61 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.56 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.
  • Photochromic Len Color - Grey

1.67 High Index ASP

  • Thinner compare to 1.61 Index lenses.
  • Anti-scratch Hard Coating.
  • Super Hydrophobic Anti-Reflective Coating (Water Resistant, Easy to clean) - Recommended for outdoor settings.
  • Photochromic Len Color - Grey

 

SHOP EYEGLASSES 

Lenses Index and Types

We are committing to delivery best eye care in terms of providing best in industy lenses indexes to provide most clear view. To continue with our commitment, we only support  High indexes prescription lenses to our cusomter to deliver best quality lenses with more thinner, lighter and higher density. 

Following are the types of lens we supports:

CLEAR LENS - Recommended for Indoor Setting

VisionPro Glasses - Clear Lenses

SUNGLASSES LENS (POLARIZED AND NON-POLARIZED) - Good for Outdoor Settings

VisionPro Glasses - Sunglasses Lenses

PHOTOCHROMIC LENS (Self Tinting) - Best for both Indoor and Outdoor Settings

VisionPro Glasses - Photochromic Lenses

Lens Overview

When buying eyeglasses, the frame you choose is important to both your appearance and your comfort when wearing glasses. But the eyeglass lenses you choose influence four factors: appearance, comfort, vision and safety.

Some of the popular lens are as follows:

Aspheric: Conventional lenses have a front surface that is spherical, meaning it has the same curve across its entire surface. Aspheric lenses have a more complex front surface that gradually changes in curvature from the center of the lens out to the edge. Aspheric lenses provide correction for small distortions in vision. As a side benefit, they are also typically thinner and lighter than some other lenses.

Bifocals: Bifocals are sectioned into two distinct parts, which give the user clear distance and near (generally), with no transition or correction in between.

High-Index Plastic: This type of lens provides more protection from ultraviolet rays than traditional lenses. It’s thin production also allows it to be much lighter. These lenses are thinner and lighter than CR-39 plastic lenses because they have a higher index of refraction and may also have a lower specific gravity.

Polarized: This lens is able to reduce the glare often noticed from water, snow and other flat, reflective surfaces, which makes it a popular choice for sunglasses. Most polarized lenses provide UV protection, which is important to maintaining healthy eye sight.

Photochromic: This specialty lens is able to switch from a clear appearance in dark conditions to a darkened appearance in bright conditions. Like the high-index plastic, this lens also protects from UV rays.

Progressive: These have three main zones for distance, intermediate and reading, so users can enjoy the convenience of not having to take their glasses on and off and can view all distances in one lens. Unlike typical bifocals and trifocals, progressive lenses don’t have lines separating the lens sections-a big win for the style-conscious!

Reading: This lens usually doesn’t have a prescription. Rather it has a magnifying power designed to help people read.

Apart from the lens there are coatings which can we added:

Anti-reflective coating: Anti-reflective coating can reduce eyestrain caused from glare, reflections, and the "halos" you see around lights at night. It helps protect your lenses from scratches and smudges, and can repel dust and water. This coating makes your vision sharper and your eyes appear clearer behind your lenses. Some anti-reflective coatings reduce the amount of reflected UV from the back of your lenses, providing the best overall UV protection possible. Anti-reflective coating is especially important if you choose high-index lenses, because the higher the refractive index of a lens material, the more light the lenses reflect. In fact, high-index lenses can reflect up to 50 percent lighter than CR-39 lenses, causing significantly more glare, unless AR coating is applied.

Blue Light Reduction: is a next-generation lens coating that combats digital eye strain by reducing the exposure to blue light emitted by electronic devices. This attractive, near-clear coating also optimizes visual performance, improves visual comfort, enhances your appearance, and extends the life of your lenses. Over time, blue light can have an impact on the retina and has been associated with age-related macular degeneration. Continuous use of digital devices can lead to a variety of eye strain symptoms such as tired or dry eyes, blurred vision, and headache, as well as back, neck, or shoulder pain.

What is Blue light?

Humans can see a thin spectrum of light, ranging from red to violet. Shorter wavelengths appear blue, while the longer ones appear red. Light rays that have relatively long wavelengths contain less energy, and those with short wavelengths have more lights. Also, blue light is referred to as “High Energy Visible” (HEV) light.

(https://www.allaboutvision.com/cvs/blue-light.htm)

As nothing is good or bad in earth, everything comes with certain advantage and disadvantage. There are points which we remember regarding blue light:

Blue light is everywhere:

Sunlight is the main source of light (HEV),  as we are exposed to it when we go out for work. In addition to the ample blue light in sunlight, most of the light we are exposed to via digital devices is blue. For example, the most common type of LED used in electronic devices is a white-light LED, which actually has a peak emission in the blue wavelength range (400 – 490 nm).

The eye is not very good at blocking blue light:

Despite the fact that the eye is very effective in blocking UV rays from reaching the retina, the eye is not very good at blocking blue light.  Virtually all visible blue light passes through the cornea and lens and reaches the retina. The effect of this exposure is cumulative, and the total number of exposure hours is what matters.

Blue light exposure may lead to:

Digital eyestrain: Computer screens and other digital devices emit significant amounts of blue light (HEV) and people are spending more and more hours looking at them.  High energy blue light waves scatter more in the eye and are not as easily focused.  This scatter creates “visual noise” that reduces contrast and can contribute to digital eye strain.

Retina damage: Too much exposure to blue light can damage light sensitive cells in the retina.  This causes changes that resemble those of macular degeneration, which can lead to permanent vision loss. Studies have shown that it is the cumulative effect of this exposure that causes the damage, and that mainly affects the cones (the photo sensitive cells responsible for central vision and color vision) and the retinal pigment epithelium (cells responsible for nourishing the retinal cells).

Is blue light being that bad: Blue light boosts alertness, helps memory and cognitive function, and elevates mood. Exposure to blue light during daytime hours helps maintain a healthful circadian rhythm - the body's natural wake and sleep cycle. Not enough exposure to sunlight in children could affect the growth and development of the eyes and vision. Early studies show a deficiency in blue light exposure could contribute to the recent increase in myopia/nearsightedness.

Scratch-Resistant: Nothing will make your lenses scratch-proof, but a scratch-resistant coating can help prevent scratches from damaging your lenses. Scratch-resistant lenses can minimize every day wear and tear and help you protect your investment in quality lenses.

UV Protection: Overexposing your eyes to ultraviolet rays can cause serious eye problems such as cataracts and macular degeneration. UV protection that's built into lenses and applied as a coating can block 100% of transmitted and reflected UVA and UVB rays. It also resists dirt, water and smudges for all-round clearer vision.

Blue Light Causes - EyeStrain Lenses Blocking Blue Light- Anti EyeStrain
Blue Light Causing Eye Strain> Lens Blocking Blue Light - Anti Eye Strain

 

How to select right frame

The Frame Width 

VisionPro Eye Glasses Frame Width

Measures the entire horizontal front of the frame, from the furthest extended point on either side.

The Lens Height

VisionPro Eye Glasses Lens Height

This is the vertical height of your eyeglass lenses at the widest point of the lens within the frame. The lens height is important when measuring bifocals or progressive lenses

The Lens Width

VisionPro Eye Glasses Lens Width

This is the horizontal width of each lens at its widest point.

The Bridge

VisionPro Eye Glasses Bridge Length

The bridge width is the gap above your nose between the lenses. It is important that this is comfortable - too tight, and the glasses could pinch your nose; too loose and the glasses won't be stable on your face.

The Temple Arms

Eye glasses - Temple Arms Length

Temple length is measured along the length of the temple from one end to the other and also includes the bend.


Reader ready glasses

Presbyopia, describes the condition where as part of normal aging, the eyes lose their ability to focus up close. Presbyopia, describes the condition where as part of normal aging, the eyes lose their ability to focus up close. Reader ready on-prescription reading glasses can easily solve this problem, these glasses usually range in power from +1.00 diopter to +4.00 diopters (D). Both lenses have the same powers. 

Selecting the Proper Strength for Reading Glasses

  1. Print this page on your printer. You cannot use this chart by looking at it on your computer monitor due to the size and resolution differences among computers.
  2. The chart below is exactly 5 inches wide. Please make sure it is 5 inches wide on your printed copy.
  3. To find the strength you need, read the following Test Chart WITHOUT GLASSES from a distance of about 14 inches. The first line you have difficulty reading has the lens strength to the right. This is the correct optical power to order.

 

Attention: Reader ready reading glasses does not replace prescription eyewear. Regular exams by an eye care professional are necessary to determine your eye health status and vision needs.